AARP created a nice guide to ADUs earlier this year with some case study write-ups. They have followed up with some full length stories of the ADUs featured, including a nice interview with Bertha who had a Starlet built in St. Petersburg by Historic Shed.  https://accessorydwellings.org/2019/12/15/berthas-adu-a-tiny-cottage-in-my-sons-backyard/

Historic Shed was pleased to be featured in Shed Builder magazine. Read it here: https://shedbuildermag.com/historic-sheds/

Historic Shed was honored to receive a Community Award at the historic Vinoy Renaissance Hotel in St. Petersburg from LocalShops1. https://thegabber.com/localshops1-honors-long-standing-businesses/

We were honored to have a project by Historic Shed included in this informational publication put together by AARP on ADUs (Accessory Dwelling Units): https://www.aarp.org/content/dam/aarp/livable-communities/livable-documents/documents-2019/ADU-guide-web-singles-071619.pdf

More than a few years ago (2011 to be exact), I wrote a post about historic detached carports and included some designs of our own that we thought would be fun to build and useful in a variety of situations. Like many of my random design exercises, none of the sketches were built, until now. And I must say that it looks even better in real life than in my head.

A customer in the oldest city in the US, St. Augustine contacted us and was interested in replacing a rather rickety open garage behind her new-to-her 1920s bungalow. We started with some garage designs, but didn't find the right solution until we dusted off the carport/ shed sketches and found something that fit both the site and the customer's needs.

The existing garage had seen better days.
The main house is a wonderful shingled-sided gable bungalow with a shed dormer.
The design for the new building created half storage shed and half covered parking area, with elements that match the main house, like eave brackets and exposed rafter tails.
Building the carport shed in our shop in Brooksville.
Historic Shed built the new carport shed on the same footprint as the old garage, which is adjacent to an alley.
The building is 20' wide, with half used for locked storage and half for covered parking.
The yard side of the shed has a single door for access to the storage.
The carport ceiling has tongue and groove v-joint wood.
Eave brackets complement the main house.
The Historic Shed Carport Shed is a nice alternative to a fully enclosed garage or a standard shed, providing both covered parking and storage.

We are now offering plans for the Carport Shed for sale online for the DIYer or those not located in Florida: Carport Shed Construction Plans

Historic Shed recently was able to put its mark on our own Hernando County by building a new 8'x8' parking attendant shed for the Pine Island Beach Park. While Hernando County is located directly on the Gulf of Mexico, there are few public beaches, with Pine Island Park offering the only sandy Gulf beach. Therefore our little shack will be seen by many residents and visitors to Hernando County, particularly as Florida winter weather attracts northerners in the next couple of months. The island history is important in Hernando County history and some interesting background on the island and surrounding area can be read here in the Hernando Sun.

The Gulf is very shallow off Hernando County and while Pine Island is beautiful, it is more a wading beach than a swimming beach.

The birds really like the beach at Pine Island. I take a photo of the footprint patterns nearly every time I go there.

Here are some of the beach footprint makers: Black Skimmers

 

The small shed was placed on a concrete slab and the interior will be finished out by the county. The layout allows the parking attendant to take in the parking fee, while enjoying  cool air from a ClimateRight 5000 BTU unit. The vibrant colors were chosen by County staff, who clearly had a really good time making their choices. The colors will compliment a new fence and playground equipment that are part of the overall park upgrades.

The shed's vibrant colors now greet all visitors to the park. The cypress shutters are operable and allow the windows to be secured after hours and during storms. Hooks hold them open so that breezes won't slam them shut.

Flood vents are located on two sides of the shed as it is located within a flood zone.

Shutters closed and latched. This is what shutters are designed to do.

The batten shutters really make a nice accent on the shed, as well as being functional.

We design a lot of custom sheds that complement historic bungalows, but most are commonly covered with lap or novelty siding. Recently we got a chance to built a slightly differently clad shed for a unique 1940s bungalow in New Port Richey. The house, and an existing garage on the lot are both covered completely in wood shingles, so we designed the new shed accordingly.

The cedar shingles made the shop smell so good!

Walls up and roof dried in.

The shed is designed for use as a workshop with a small door for every day use and a large one for bigger items. The windows on the side are double-hung, meaning that the top slides down and the bottom slides up.

The front gable elevation has a vent that matches the main house.

Shed details showing 1x6 roof sheathing, cedar shingle siding, awning windows and traditional trim.

The shed nestled in the yard.

We've been advertisers in Hyde Park Living and Palma Ceia Living magazines (really nice full-sized glossy magazines) since they were first published a few years ago, as these are two of our favorite south Tampa neighborhoods. When I mentioned a recent project to the magazine director, Bradley Hassen, she very nicely offered to do a feature article in the magazines. The project highlighted is a two-story garage-apartment recently built in the Historic Hyde Park neighborhood. The article appears in the February issue of Hyde Park Living and will also be in the March issue of Palma Ceia Living. The magazines are mailed to residents of each neighborhood. Click on the link below to see the article in better detail.

Tampa Bay Times writer Logan Neill wrote a lovely feature article on Historic Shed that ran in Sunday's paper. We'd spoken to Mr. Neill several times over the past year as a local non-profit struggled to save the historic Chinsegut Hill Manor House. Mr. Neill, a Brooksville resident, has been one of the biggest advocates of saving the antebellum house and our paths crossed as we became involved in the project.

Here's the article he wrote about Historic Shed:

Brooksville business matches new outbuildings with historic structures

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