News and Updates

  • One of the perks of being in the preservation business is seeing all sorts of great historic sites that aren't always available to the public. When we worked primarily as historic preservation consultants under our Preservation Resource, Inc. mantle, we got to crawl in attics and private rooms of house museums, disused hotels, and even airplane hangers. Now, as we focus on making outbuildings for historic neighborhoods, we get to see private homes that aren't open to the public (I never say no when invited inside for a moment). One of the recent highlights was seeing a high-style Craftsman style bungalow in the Old Northeast neighborhood in St. Petersburg that was under rehabilitation. Known as the Sargent House, 806 18th Avenue NE was recently designated as a historic landmark by its newest owners, Sharon Winters and Kendall Reid. Originally built in 1923 by LeRoy and Marjorie Sargent, the house is significant for its architecture as a rare example of higher-style Craftsman design and construction in the airplane bungalow type. (See the full report at: http://www.stpete.org/committee%20packets/Community%20Planning%20and%20Preservation%20Commission/2016-04-12%20Reports.pdf). A local landmark designation recognizes structures or places that have historic value or that exemplify cultural, economic, or social value to the city, state, or nation. The benefits of this designation include neighborhood stabilization, increased heritage tourism through the maintenance of our historic character, relief from some of the requirements of the Florida Building Code, and an ad valorem tax exemption. Historic Shed was hired to design and build a small storage shed to be placed behind the house. The simple shed incorporated elements from the house such as the gable detailing, roof pitch, and outrigger design.

  • Craftsman Bungalow Garage Orlando

    Earlier this year we built a custom garage in the historic Lake Lawsona- Ferncreek neighborhood in Orlando, Florida. Unfortunately, when the garage was first finished, we didn't get very good photos. Luckily, when we went back in April for the Lake Lawsona Garden Tour, we were able to swing by and see the garage nestled beautifully in the finished yard. The Lake Lawsona - Ferncreek Garden Tour takes place every other year, alternating annually with the Lake Eola Heights Neighborhood Garden Tour and is well worth attending. This year, we were given booth space near H. H. Dickson Azalea Park, which is a phenomenal historic natural landscape park comprised of a ravine down the middle of the neighborhood. It is a great asset that complements the lovely 1920s homes that make up the neighborhood.

  • Historic Shed Vent detail

    Some home details are just so lovely they just have to be replicated. For this 10'x12' shed that Historic Shed built in the historic Duckpond Neighborhood in Gainesville, Florida, the eave brackets and unique gable vents were replicated to create a one of a kind shed. The result is a main house and shed that harmonize very well. The shed design was reviewed and approved by the local historic preservation office.

  • Every time we are approached by an artist in need of a studio, we end up with a unique shed design that is worthy of showing off. In this case, a local artist in Citrus County requested a fairly large 14'x16' shed with lots of windows. The design has great balance, is filled with light and looks lovely with a great set of accent French doors. It will serve as a great "She Shed" for the owner.

  • Presentation given at the 2016 Historic Homes Workshop in Tampa and the Lakeland Historic Home Workshop. The presentation touched on the history of outbuildings in historic neighborhoods, preserving existing outbuildings, and designing new compatible accessory buildings, including accessory dwelling units (aka Tiny Homes). Outbuildings for Historic Homes from Historic Shed

  •   The Historic Homes Workshop holds its 8th annual event February 19th- 21st and 27th at the Wood Window Makeover campus located at 1706 W. Cypress St, 33606. Dozens of old house professionals from across the nation converge and unite to empower the next generation of old house lovers. With over 80,000 buildings in the Tampa Bay area that are historic/vintage/old, there’s 80,000 reasons to come to the Historic Homes Workshop. More information is available at woodwindowmakeover.com/historic-homes-workshop.com, or contact Steve Quillian at 813-404-6498. The workshop begins Friday, February 19 at 6:00 pm with a catered kick-off party, complete with live music. Saturday morning beginning at 9:00 am, the Historic Homes Workshop showcases “how to” sessions with the professionals. Some of the sessions, such as “Starting Your Own Preservation Business” by best-selling author and preservation contractor, Scott Sidler of Austin Home Restorations in Orlando and “The Preservation Mindset” by Jo-Anne Peck of Historic Shed in Brooksville are geared to encourage and empower the next generation to get involved in preserving old buildings. Other sessions, such as “Stained Glass Repairs” by Joe Cannata of Hyde Park Art Glass in Tampa and “Repairing Wood Floors” by Dennis Prieur of Through the Woods Fine Floors in Tampa, offer practical information on materials and methods. The Historic Homes Workshop’s main draw however has become the “Hands-On” element that begins Sunday morning, February 21st at 8:00am at the Seminole Heights United Methodist Church in Tampa. Historic Window Preservation Professionals from as far away as New Hampshire and Maine and as close as Tampa, Orlando and Jacksonville are coming together to donate their time and skills to teach participants how to bring old windows back to life, by actually restoring the windows on the church building. Last year the workshop was able to donate over $15,000 worth of window restoration services to Habitat for Humanity Pinellas. This year the workshop is pushing to donate over $20,000. All efforts and money raised through the workshop go toward the Church’s window restoration fund. Bill Hunter, secretary of the Old Seminole Heights Neighborhood Association said about the 2015 Historic Homes Workshop, “I enjoyed your window event very much. It was a great experience and I learned a great deal. Please let me know of any future ones like it." The hands-on portion of the Historic Homes Workshop concludes on Saturday, February 27th at the Seminole Heights United Methodist Church with participants completing the window restoration started the previous weekend. The goal of the Historic Homes Workshop has always been to empower those who love old buildings with knowledge of materials and methods they need to care for their buildings. With 80,000 historic/vintage/old buildings in the Tampa Bay area alone, a new goal of empowering and equipping the next generation of those who love old buildings has begun. Steve Quillian, founder of Wood Window Makeover and the Historic Homes Workshop, has made it his personal goal for each historic neighborhood to have a competent historic window restorer of its own. Quick Facts about the Historic Homes Workshop:  This is the 8th Annual Historic Homes Workshop  February 19-21, 27, 2016  16 Useful workshop sessions on Saturday, Feb 20  Hands on workshop Sunday, Feb 21 and Saturday, Feb 27  Donated over $15,000 last year and possibly $20,000 this year  Professionals from across the United States contribute  People from as far away as Canada come to attend

  • Historic Shed™ recently completed a lovely flamingo pink shed set by a pool in a well landscaped backyard in Dania Beach. The shed had SmartSide smooth lap siding, cypress trim, 4x4 eave brackets, JeldWen double-hung wood windows, and a pair of French doors.

  • Last summer we built a shed in the historic Village of Longboat on Longboat Key, which was the talk of the neighborhood according to our customers. The home where the shed was built is the oldest building on the island, built in 1902 and was originally an Inn and Restaurant. The shed we built for them used elements of the main building, including novelty wood siding and a metal roof. It was the first one we built with a transom over the shed doors, which turned out to be a really nice architectural feature. The shed was set to the rear of the main building, along the side yard with access to the rear alley. It was set far enough from the side property line to allow storage of kayaks and other  equipment, so the owners had the concrete pad extended to the side. The shed had a very steep roof, gable vent that complemented the main house, and a double set of doors that faced the rear alley. The side of the shed has a central doors flanked by two 6/1 windows. There are also flood vents since the area is located in a flood zone. About 9 months after completing the shed, we were contacted by a neighbor in Longboat Key who also lived in a historic home. His home was originally the one-room school house for the village, which had been transformed into a residence in the 1950s. He liked the neighbor's shed just the way it was, so asked for something similar, using elements that complemented his home. The Village of Longboat Key has an interesting history and is worth a walk around if you are heading to the beach in that area (which is definitely worth visiting as well). For a walking tour, see: http://www.longboatkeyhistory.com/tour-route--history.html and  http://www.longboatkeyhistory.com/map--details-of-tour-route.html. As you walk around, keep an eye out for the roaming peacocks, which add a nice eccentric touch to the area.

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